Emily has covered the space industry for TechCrunch. See some of her featured work below.

Here's What We Know About the SpaceX Explosion

Here's What We Know About the SpaceX Explosion

Russia and SpaceX Change The Rules Of The Military Launch Market  

Russia and SpaceX Change The Rules Of The Military Launch Market

 

Einstein's Gravitational Waves Have Been Detected for the First Time

Einstein's Gravitational Waves Have Been Detected for the First Time

China Invests in the Hunt for Aliens by Building the World's Largest Radio Telescope

China Invests in the Hunt for Aliens by Building the World's Largest Radio Telescope

Astronomers Have Found the Closest Exoplanet to Earth

Astronomers Have Found the Closest Exoplanet to Earth

Blue Origin Continues Successful, Record-Setting Year

Blue Origin Continues Successful, Record-Setting Year

Masters Thesis, MIT

An Evaluation of Short Innovation Contest Implementation in the Federal Context
Emily Dawn Calandrelli
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2013
Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
Technology and Policy Program
Abstract
PDF

Layman's terms, described by Emily:  In my thesis I outline a number of reasons why the market of government contracting is not as efficient/competitive as it could be. This is especially important at NASA where over 80% of budgetary spending is allocated to the procurement process. Changes in the environment of information access and distribution have enabled a new solution - crowdsourced contests - which can alleviate some of these problems.  The purpose of my thesis was to better understand the application of contests as a tool for technology procurement in government agencies.

I presented a proposed methodology to compare costs of contests to that of traditional procurement methods.  I applied this proposed cost analysis to four contest case studies.  Through interviews with the program managers who were in charge of these contests I was able to shed light on the main management considerations that must be made by government leaders who wish to employ contests for technology procurement.  Lastly, I analyzed the policies relevant to federal contest use and made recommendations to improve on these policies' limitations.